RoboLab im Technischen Museum Wien 2012

The Ars Electronica Futurelab developed a new RoboLab for the exhibition „Robots: Machine and Human?“ at the Museum of Technology. In this part of the exhibition, the visitors are invited to get to know and experiment with a variety of robots. In this context, programming and navigating robots can be explored in a playful way.

 

Credit: Michael Kaczorowski
Credit: Michael Kaczorowski

 

CodedMaze

 

Coded Maze. Credit: Michael Kaczorowski
Coded Maze. Credit: Michael Kaczorowski

 

A simple computer game provides the platform to experience different ways of programming robots. It is the aim to navigate through the maze and collect objects with a fixed number of steps. The robot can be programmed in two ways, either through punch cards – the predecessors of modern storage media – or through visual programming.

 

Sensor Brix

 

Sensor Brix. Credit: Michael Kaczorowski
Sensor Brix. Credit: Michael Kaczorowski

 

Sensors are the “sensory organs” of computers, enabling them to perceive their environment. This installation shows how they function and allows the visitors to modify the robot landscape accordingly.

 

RobotMe!

 

Robot Me. Credit: Michael Kaczorowski
Robot Me. Credit: Michael Kaczorowski

 

People’s  heads, bodies and legs can be combined with robot parts. Each visitor is photographed in a lightbox, then a computer divides each picture into horizontal stripes – head, body, legs.  The individual body parts are projected onto a projection wall. Via an interface, the visitors can combine them with body parts from other visitors or robots, create a new body and send this picture via e-mail to their friends.

 

RoboZoo

 

Rpbo Zoo. Credit: Michael Kaczorowski
Rpbo Zoo. Credit: Michael Kaczorowski

 

In this arena, humanoid robots, spider robots and cycle robots can be moved via remote control or tablet. The seal robot “Paro” perceives its environment through five computer-controlled sensors.

 

Behind The Eye

 

Behind The Eye. Credit: Michael Kaczorowski
Behind The Eye. Credit: Michael Kaczorowski

 

On the displays, individual steps of image processing are shown. On the left, the initial data is shown – the original camera image. Then follow form recognition and transformation into a binary black & white picture.

 

Catch me if you can!

 

Catch Me If You Can. Credit: Michael Kaczorowski
Catch Me If You Can. Credit: Michael Kaczorowski

 

The visitors can remote-control a small robot on wheels to escape an industrial robot which is on its track and wants to catch it with a magnetic arm. If the visitor is too slow, the robot is put back to the starting point.

 

Nyoro Nyoro

 

Nyro Nyro. Credit: Michael Kaczorowski
Nyro Nyro. Credit: Michael Kaczorowski

 

Based on real-time analysis, this robot reacts to the visitors. For instance, if they hold up a yellow ball in front of Nyoro Nyoro’s camera eye, it expresses what it sees via motion and acoustics.

The exhibition “Robots: Machine and Human?” opens on December 14, 2012 at the Museum of Technology in Vienna.  Further information:http://www.technischesmuseum.at/ausstellung/roboter


Konzept und Experience Design:

Christopher Lindinger

Hideaki Ogawa

Projektleitung:

Veronika Pauser

Design und Development:

Veronika Pauser, Roland Aigner, Michael Mayr, Michael Platz, Matthew Gardiner, Andreas Jalsovec, Andreas Pramböck, Cecile Bucher, Oliver Elias, Kerstin Dintner, Christian Fuchs