Jury 1987 – 2017

80s 1987 1988 1989
90s 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999
00s 1987 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
10s 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Jury 1989

Computergraphik
Computer Animation
Computermusik

1989 Prix Jury: COMPUTER GRAPHICS

Paolo Calcagno (IT)
Naples, Journalist

Paolo Calcagno was born in 1944 in Naples; since 1983 he is working with the Corriere della Sera specializing in media, TV and computer graphics, cinema and theater critics. In a weekly column in Corriere della Sera he comments on TV audiences, a relevant factor in Italian state TV policy. Paolo Calcagno is the Italian responsible for the “Alice” European culture magazine. Furthermore, he makes concepts and TV programs for RAI, among others a 45 minute TV special about “Prix Ars Electronica 89”, about the “XXX Festival Internazionale della Televisione di Monte Carlo”, about the “Biennale of New Artists of Mediterrania” in Bologna. Various books, among them about Edoardo de Filippo titled “La vita è dispari”. Presently he is working at a book with the project title “Meeting Just Before the Third Millennium”, where various personalities from art and culture like Peter Handke, Karlheiz Stockhausen, Fernando Arrabal, Eugène Ionesco, Dario Fo etc, talk about contemporary topics.

Loren Carpenter (US)
San Rafael, CA, Senior scientist for PIXAR

Active in computer graphics algorithm research for 20 years. 1980 he presented at Siggraph the first practical fracta1 animated film “vol libre’: a landmark c1assic in computer animation. The creation of mountainous landscapes was further refined, when he developed an antialiased version for cinema. For five years member of the computer division of Lucas-film ltd. (the group that became PIXAR), where he led the technical effort to achieve cinema-quality computer animation. He was the principal architect and programmer for the “genesis demonstration” sequence from the film “Star Trek II”. 1985 he received the Siggraph “Computer Graphics Achievement Award”. It represented many discoveries which advanced computer graphics (extremely robust parametric patch rendering algorithms, efficient approximations fractal curves, contributions to the development of stochastic sampling). His function at PIXAR is to conduct basic research on computer graphics, assist in translating the new discoveries into hardware, then utilize hardware to make images and conduct further research.

Herbert W. Franke (AT)
Munich, Artist and Scientist

Born 1927 in Vienna. From 1954 onward, creative radiography and light graphics, since 1955 theoretical works about rational aesthetics. 1956 application of an analogous data processing system and of a cathode-ray oscilloscope for experimental aesthetics. 1969 works on futurology. Since 1970 computer graphics and films with digital systems, since 1973 lectureship on “cybernetic aesthetics” at the University of Munich, 1979/80 lectureship for perception psychology at the “Fachhochschule” Bielefeld. Since 1985 lectureship for computer graphics/art at the Academy of Visual Arts in Munich. Since 1988 corresponding member of the Académie Européenne des sciences, des arts et des lettres. Publication of several books on experimental photography and computer graphics.

John Halas (HU/UK)
Budapest, animation director
John Halas (born János Halász) 1912 in Budapest was a pioneering Hungarian animator. He studied under George Pal at the Académie des Beaux-Arts in Paris. He co-founded Hungary’s first animaiton studio Coloriton in 1932. With Coloriton he produced high-quality promotion-oriented animations for television and cinema, including “Boldog király kincse” (The Treasure of the Joyful King). 1936 he moved to England where, together with his wife Joy Batchelor, he founded Halas and Batchelor in 1940. Over the years the made over 2000 short subjects. Their best-known film, “Animal Farm” (1954), was the first full-length animated film made in Great Britain. 1972 he received a distiction from Queen Elizabeth II for his contributions to the British film industry. In 1975 he founded the Association internationale du film d’animation (Asifa), which he directed for ten years as president. Since 1980 he is the chairman of the British Federation of Film Societies.
Peter Kogler (AT)
Vienna, Artist

Born 1959 in Innsbruck / Austria, lives in Vienna and Paris. After attending Innsbruck’s Kunstgewerbeschule, he moved to Vienna and studied at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste (one Semester). Since then Peter Kogler has lived as a freelance artist and ranks among the young talents of the Austrian Art scene. As a draughtsman he is interested in live use of the computer since 1984 for artistic purposes. Peter Kogler’s drawings and computer works were exhibited in renowned art galleries in Innsbruck, Vienna, Basel, Cologne, Hamburg, New York and at the Venice Biennale in 1986.

Roger F. Malina (US)
Paris, Scientist

Roger F. Malina was born in 1950 in Paris, France. He attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he obtained a Bachelors Degree in physics, and the University of California, Berkeley, where he obtained a Ph.D. in astronomy. He is currently a Research Astronomer at the Space Sciences Laboratory in Berkeley, California; he is responsible for the telescopes which will be launched in 1991 on NASA’s Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite. He is also an experimenter in the NASA telescience program for development of new methods in scientific research using telecommunications and remote operations from the NASA Space Station. Roger F. Malina has written on the role of the artist in space exploration. In addition to his scientific activities, Roger Malina is the Executive Editor of “Leonardo” the international journal of art and technology; this journal was started 20 years ago by kinetic artist Frank J. Malina to document the work of artists working with science and new technologies. Roger Malina is also the chairman of the non-profit International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology; in addition to publishing “Leonardo” this society awards annually the “Leonardo” Coler-Maxwell and New Horizons prizes to recognise artists and scientists seeking to integrate contemporary art with science and technology.

Alfred Nemeczek (DE)
Hamburg, Art Journalist

Born 1933 in Kassel/Germany, qualified in 1954 for university entrance, then trainee on the newspaper “Hessische Nachrichten”. From 1956-67 worked as art journalist for the above newspaper. In the meantime studied German Language and Literature as well as Art History at Marburg/Lahn. 1964 press officer of documenta III in Kassel. 1967-73 art journalist for the German magazine “Der Spiegel” in Hamburg. Up to 1979 art joumalist for the magazine “Stern”. Since then deputy chief editor of the art magazine ART in Hamburg. Specialist fields : fine arts, f11m, new media; occasionally sits on juries; writes articles in various professional magazines.


1989 Prix Jury: COMPUTER ANIMATION

Paolo Calcagno (IT)
Naples, Journalist

Paolo Calcagno was born in 1944 in Naples; since 1983 he is working with the Corriere della Sera specializing in media, TV and computer graphics, cinema and theater critics. In a weekly column in Corriere della Sera he comments on TV audiences, a relevant factor in Italian state TV policy. Paolo Calcagno is the Italian responsible for the “Alice” European culture magazine. Furthermore, he makes concepts and TV programs for RAI, among others a 45 minute TV special about “Prix Ars Electronica 89”, about the “XXX Festival Internazionale della Televisione di Monte Carlo”, about the “Biennale of New Artists of Mediterrania” in Bologna. Various books, among them about Edoardo de Filippo titled “La vita è dispari”. Presently he is working at a book with the project title “Meeting Just Before the Third Millennium”, where various personalities from art and culture like Peter Handke, Karlheiz Stockhausen, Fernando Arrabal, Eugène Ionesco, Dario Fo etc, talk about contemporary topics.

Loren Carpenter (US)
San Rafael, CA, Senior scientist for PIXAR

Active in computer graphics algorithm research for 20 years. 1980 he presented at Siggraph the first practical fracta1 animated film “vol libre’: a landmark c1assic in computer animation. The creation of mountainous landscapes was further refined, when he developed an antialiased version for cinema. For five years member of the computer division of Lucas-film ltd. (the group that became PIXAR), where he led the technical effort to achieve cinema-quality computer animation. He was the principal architect and programmer for the “genesis demonstration” sequence from the film “Star Trek II”. 1985 he received the Siggraph “Computer Graphics Achievement Award”. It represented many discoveries which advanced computer graphics (extremely robust parametric patch rendering algorithms, efficient approximations fractal curves, contributions to the development of stochastic sampling). His function at PIXAR is to conduct basic research on computer graphics, assist in translating the new discoveries into hardware, then utilize hardware to make images and conduct further research.

Herbert W. Franke (AT)
Munich, Artist and Scientist

Born 1927 in Vienna. From 1954 onward, creative radiography and light graphics, since 1955 theoretical works about rational aesthetics. 1956 application of an analogous data processing system and of a cathode-ray oscilloscope for experimental aesthetics. 1969 works on futurology. Since 1970 computer graphics and films with digital systems, since 1973 lectureship on “cybernetic aesthetics” at the University of Munich, 1979/80 lectureship for perception psychology at the “Fachhochschule” Bielefeld. Since 1985 lectureship for computer graphics/art at the Academy of Visual Arts in Munich. Since 1988 corresponding member of the Académie Européenne des sciences, des arts et des lettres. Publication of several books on experimental photography and computer graphics.

John Halas (HU/UK)
Budapest, animation director

John Halas (born János Halász) 1912 in Budapest was a pioneering Hungarian animator. He studied under George Pal at the Académie des Beaux-Arts in Paris. He co-founded Hungary’s first animaiton studio Coloriton in 1932. With Coloriton he produced high-quality promotion-oriented animations for television and cinema, including “Boldog király kincse” (The Treasure of the Joyful King). 1936 he moved to England where, together with his wife Joy Batchelor, he founded Halas and Batchelor in 1940. Over the years the made over 2000 short subjects. Their best-known film, “Animal Farm” (1954), was the first full-length animated film made in Great Britain. 1972 he received a distiction from Queen Elizabeth II for his contributions to the British film industry. In 1975 he founded the Association internationale du film d’animation (Asifa), which he directed for ten years as president. Since 1980 he is the chairman of the British Federation of Film Societies.

Peter Kogler (AT)
Vienna, Artist

Born 1959 in Innsbruck / Austria, lives in Vienna and Paris. After attending Innsbruck’s Kunstgewerbeschule, he moved to Vienna and studied at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste (one Semester). Since then Peter Kogler has lived as a freelance artist and ranks among the young talents of the Austrian Art scene. As a draughtsman he is interested in live use of the computer since 1984 for artistic purposes. Peter Kogler’s drawings and computer works were exhibited in renowned art galleries in Innsbruck, Vienna, Basel, Cologne, Hamburg, New York and at the Venice Biennale in 1986.

Roger F. Malina (US)
Paris, Scientist

Roger F. Malina was born in 1950 in Paris, France. He attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he obtained a Bachelors Degree in physics, and the University of California, Berkeley, where he obtained a Ph.D. in astronomy. He is currently a Research Astronomer at the Space Sciences Laboratory in Berkeley, California; he is responsible for the telescopes which will be launched in 1991 on NASA’s Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite. He is also an experimenter in the NASA telescience program for development of new methods in scientific research using telecommunications and remote operations from the NASA Space Station. Roger F. Malina has written on the role of the artist in space exploration. In addition to his scientific activities, Roger Malina is the Executive Editor of “Leonardo” the international journal of art and technology; this journal was started 20 years ago by kinetic artist Frank J. Malina to document the work of artists working with science and new technologies. Roger Malina is also the chairman of the non-profit International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology; in addition to publishing “Leonardo” this society awards annually the “Leonardo” Coler-Maxwell and New Horizons prizes to recognise artists and scientists seeking to integrate contemporary art with science and technology.

Alfred Nemeczek (DE)
Hamburg, Art Journalist

Born 1933 in Kassel/Germany, qualified in 1954 for university entrance, then trainee on the newspaper “Hessische Nachrichten”. From 1956-67 worked as art journalist for the above newspaper. In the meantime studied German Language and Literature as well as Art History at Marburg/Lahn. 1964 press officer of documenta III in Kassel. 1967-73 art journalist for the German magazine “Der Spiegel” in Hamburg. Up to 1979 art joumalist for the magazine “Stern”. Since then deputy chief editor of the art magazine ART in Hamburg. Specialist fields : fine arts, f11m, new media; occasionally sits on juries; writes articles in various professional magazines.


1989 Prix Jury: COMPUTER MUSIC

Jean-Baptiste Barrière (FR)
Paris, Composer, musical research

Born 1958 in Paris. Studies inc1uded music, philosophy, mathematical logic. Doctoral thesis on “Systems and Models in Twentieth Century Music” at the Sorbonne University in Paris. Since 1981 researcher at IRCAM (sound synthesis, computer supported composition in the CHANT/FORMES project, education, musical research). 1984-1987 Head of Musical Research Department in IRCAM. First published record “Pandemonium” 1978; winner of the Digital Music Award at the International Electro-Acoustic Music Competition of Bourges in 1983; co-realized with Kaija Saariaho the music of “Collisions”, a multi-media show by Pierre Friloux and Francoise Gedanken (premiered at Ars Electronica 84). 1988 realization of “Venus Hybrid”, installation with computer music and synthetic images together with Pierre Friloux for the First New York Festival. 1988-89 cooperation with Kaija Saariaho for the multi-media show “A Christmas for Vincent Van Gogh” (premiere at New York 1989). Concerts in Japan, USA, Canada and various European countries.

Hubert Bognermayr (AT)
Linz, Computer Musician

Born 1948 in Linz / Austria. Piano lessons at the Brucknerkonservatorium in Linz. Studies of paedagogiy. Since 1968 working in the field of electronic music. 1969 foundation of “Eela Craig” a group specialized in “sinfonic and rockelectronic” music. Various concerts and three record releases. In 1979 Bognermayr was a cofounder of Ars Electronica the Linz festival of Art, Technology and society. 1980 he founded the Music Computer Team, experimenting with compositions and natural sound sources. 1982 premiere of “Erdenklang” a computeracoustic sinfony within Ars Electronica; followed by “Sermon on the Mountain” 1984. Collaborations with Herbert von Karajan; Mike Oldfield; Vienna’s Burgtheater (“Antigone”) and 1987 with Andre Heller for Luna Luna / Hamburg where Bognermayr designed the soundconcept for “Dali’s Dome”. 1988 Bognermayr founded “Blue Chip” The First Digital Philharmonic Orchestra.

William Buxton (CA)
Composer, Performer and Instrumentdesigner

William Buxton is typical of an emerging breed of artist/scientist. Buxton has a degree in music from Queen’s University. He studied Sonology at the State University of Utrecht, Holland, and holds an M.Sc. in Computer Science from the University of Toronto. Since 1970, he has focused largely on works that utilized electronic media, both audio and visual. In the process, he became interested in the design and improvement of electronic and computer-based instruments. Since 1982 he has been a research scientist at the Computer Systems Research Institute at the University of Toronto, where he co-directs the computer graphics laboratory. He is currently working as a visiting scientist at Rank Xerox’s new Cambridge EuroPARC research facility. Buxton is on the editorial board of the journal Human Computer Interaction. Member of the Human-Factors Society. He has published and lectured extensively on human-computer interaction. With Ron Baecker, he is co-editor of the book “Readings in Human-Computer Interaction: A Multi-Disciplinary Approach”. He is a composer and performer whose works have been performed and broadcast throughout North America and Europe.

Dieter Kaufmann (AT)
Feldkirchen, Composer

Born 1941 in Vienna. Studied Musical Education, Germanistic linguistics, Arts History, violincello, composition with Schiske, Einem, Messiaen and Leibowitz as well as electroacoustic music with Franyois Bayle and Pierre Schaeffer at the Groupe de Recherches Musicales of French Broadcasting Corp. Since 1970 lecturer electro-acoustical music at Vienna Music College. 1979 founder of “K&K Experimentalstudio” together with the actress Gunda König. Since 1983 composition c1ass at Carinthia State Conservatory and president of Austria’s IGNM section. Compositions commissioned by festivals, music ensembles and orchestras. Numerous records.

Thomas Kessler (CH)
Allschwil (Basel), Composer

Born 1937 in Zurich. Germanistic and Romanic linguistics at Zurich and Paris Universities. Studied music at the State College of Music in Berlin with Heinz F. Hartig, Boris Blacher and Ernst Pepping. 1965 he founded his own studio for electronic music. 1968 Berlin Young Generation Arts Award. In the following years director of Berlin Electronic Beat Studio and musical director of the Centre Universitaire International de Formation et de Recherche Dramatiques at Nancy. Since 1973 lecturer for theorie and composition at the Basel Music Academy. Numerous computer music compositions, e.g. “Drumphony” for drums, computer and orchestra (1981), “Flute Control” for flute and computer (1986).